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John Olsen

The Sydney Morning Herald
Steve Meacham
14 September 2007

The idea came from Barry Pearce, head curator of Australian art, who has prepared the gallery's big summer exhibition, Sidney Nolan: A New Retrospective, which opens on November 2. Pearce's starting point was Nolan's fascination with the 19th century French poet Arthur Rimbaud.

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Studio (extract)
John McDonald
2007

John Olsen is used to being treated like a star, but even he was surprised at the reaction when he won the 2005 Archibald prize with his Self-portrait, Janus faced. "I felt impaled by it," he says. "For three months it was impossible to walk the streets of Sydney or Bowral without being congratulated by very nice people. I was always being asked for interviews.

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Financial Review (page 26, Saleroom)
Katrina Strickland
19th October 2006

Melbourne property developers Lustig & Moar appear intent on paying record prices for the paintings they want in their new contemporary art collection. After paying $2.04 million last month for Brett Whiteley’s Frangipani and Hummingbird: Japanese Summer, setting a new record for the sale of a Whiteley at auction

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The Australian Financial Review
Katrina Strickland
16 October 2006

A new record for a work by a living Australian artist was set in Tasmania yesterday when John Olsen's Love in the Kitchen sold for $1.093 million (including buyer's premium) to a private Melbourne collector.

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Good Weekend
Janet Hawley
September 2, 2006

'You cannot paint true beauty, true happiness, unless you also understand the depths of despair and sorrow.'

John Olsen, grand old man of Australian art, talks to Janet Hawley

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The Weekend Australian: The Nation
John Stapleton
April 22-23, 2006

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Australian Honours: issue No 15
November 2005

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Art Gallery of NSW
2005

John Olsen has won the 2005 Archibald Prize for his painting Self Portrait Janus Faced.

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The Age
Jane Bardon
29 April 2005

Veteran Australian painter John Olsen has won Australia's most prestigious art competition, the 2005 Archibald Prize for his painting Self Portrait Janus Faced. Olsen was today announced as the winner of the prestigious $35,000 portrait prize by the NSW Art Gallery Trust.

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Sydney Morning Herald
Steve Meacham
13 October 2004

After a delicious pea risotto which he has cooked himself, John Olsen is back in the studio on his Southern Highlands property. It's a beautiful afternoon and the 76-year-old often described as Australia's greatest living painter can afford to relax. He has just delivered 14 oil paintings and water colours to his gallery-owning son, Tim, for framing. Next week, they will go on show in Paddington, his first exhibition of new works for two years.

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clivejames.com
Clive James

For all Australians, the name of John Olsen is part of the furniture of the Sydney Opera House, because his exultant painting “Five Bells” – based on the poem by Kenneth Slessor – was hanging in the foyer when the building set sail into the world. But John Olsen’s story is bigger and more complicated than a single impact,

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National Library of Australia - Articles
Sasha Grishin

Why do so many Australian visual artists keep journals? Do these journals constitute a specific genre which would distinguish them from autobiographical diaries, sketchbooks and artist's books? What are the implications of these journals for their private audiences

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The Age, Page 13, A3
Ashley Crawford
1 May 2003

Lake Eyre continues to inspire artist John Olsen, writes Ashley Crawford. Standing on the edge of the wind-blasted Lake Eyre in late 2001, artist John Olsen flung his cane to the side. "Isn't this fantastic?," he cried, grinning broadly.

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Sunday Programme, Channel 9
Reporter : Max Cullen Producer: Catherine Hunter
30 June 2002

Painter John Olsen is unquestionably one of our greatest living artists and not only is he a great artist, but he has a reputation for good living. As NSW Art Gallery Director Edmund Capon says, "John is the most naturally gregarious spirit that has ever been created. It is his natural way to be an incurable optimist, to embrace everything and I think it was from him that I learnt my regular New Year's resolution which is to give up nothing and take up everything!"

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Press Release
National Gallery of Australia
7 December 2000

The Director of the National Gallery of Australia, Dr Brian Kennedy, today announced the purchase of one of John Olsen's most significant paintings, Sydney Sun 1965. 'The Gallery is delighted that this magnificent work by one of Australia's most distinguished artists is now part of the National Collection for all Australians to enjoy', he said.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Page 3, News and Features
Cynthia Banham
30 June 2000

"I felt like the horse that won the Melbourne Cup," the artist John Olsen declared yesterday. He was describing how he felt when his painting, Salute to Cerberus, fetched the highest price paid for an Olsen $486,500 at a Christies auction on Wednesday night. It went to a private buyer.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Page 8 Good Weekend
Interviewed by Janet Hawley
8 January 2000

John Olsen, 71, is a major Australian artist. His son Tim, 37, runs Tim Olsen Gallery in Paddington, Sydney. John Olsen has been married four times and has three children. Tim is the son of his second wife, artist Valerie Olsen.

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The Sydney Morning Herald, Page 3, News and Features
4 August 1999

The Art Gallery of NSW last night paid an auction-record price of $258,000 for a 1963 John Olsen painting which the artist hailed as one of his four or five best works. Art Gallery spokesman Mr Barry Pearce said Five Bells was "one of, if not, the Olsen masterpiece of thesixties". "We were overwhelmed by its freshness and its clarity of expression. It is an art-museum picture and a Sydney picture."

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The Australian Financial Review, Page 33, Computers
David Crowe
13 August 1996

Australian artist John Olsen last night brought aesthetics to electronics, introducing new artworks that apply his trademark style to the latest digital mobile phones.

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The University of Adelaide
Stephen Beaumont
1993

The Library is the proud possessor of a work by John Olsen which was kindly donated to the Barr Smith Library in 1991 by Mr and Mrs Max Harris. Born in Newcastle in 1928, John Olsen moved to Sydney in 1935. Between 1947 and 1953 he studied under John Passmore, painting portraits and still-lifes with a marked 'Cezanne-style cubism', a reaction to what he described as the prevailing 'boutique art' of the early 1950s.

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